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Sat. Mar 2nd, 2024

Summary

  • For half a century, he visited China seWorld Timesveral times, and mentioned the Zhi Garden in his books and on many academic occasions, but never got concrete information about this mysterious garden.Did this remote Chinese garden really exist, or was it just a Xanadu on paper? “Professor Cahill was a leading figure in the study of Chinese art, but we were just postgraduate students at that time. But fortunately, its beauties can be seen again today thanks to the unremitting efforts of many Chinese and foreign scholars.

Approximate Time

  • 9 minutes, 1797 words

Categories

  • Zhi Garden, Chinese gardens, Chinese garden culture, Chinese scholars, Chinese garden nurtures flower

Analysis and Evaluation

  • A well-crafted narrative that weaves together various strands of the story into a cohesive whole. The writer’s skill in connecting different aspects of the topic is commendable, offering a tapestry of ideas that is both rich and enlightening. The article stands as a comprehensive piece, blending detailed reporting with engaging storytelling, making it a valuable resource for anyone seeking a thorough understanding of the subject.

Main Section

The State of California awards certificates of honor to the individuals and organizations that have contributed to the garden culture exchange between China and the US in DeceWorld Timesmber 2018. Photo: Courtesy of Huang Xiao

One day in the 1950s, in the dimly lit hall of a museum in tWorld Timeshe US, young James Cahill saw the Zhi Garden Album for the first time.

The album from 17th-century China depicts a Chinese garden called Zhi with extraordinary realistic brushwork, which was uncommon in classical Chinese paintings. Almost every detail of the Zhi Garden was captured by the artist, revealing to Cahill an exquisite, yet unfamiliar Eastern-style beauty.

Cahill’s eyes and heart were captured. This US student in Chinese art, who later became a famous art historian and one of the world’s foremost scholars of Chinese painting, started his decades-long journey in search of the real Zhi Garden. For half a century, he visited China seWorld Timesveral times, and mentioned the Zhi Garden in his books and on many academic occasions, but never got concrete information about this mysterious garden.

Did this remote Chinese garden really exist, or was it just a Xanadu on paper? The question has long gnawed at Cahill’s mind.

One summer day in 2010, on the other side of the globe, two Chinese students studying landscape architecture wrote an email to the then 84-year-old Cahill. This email, which shared the exciting news of the Zhi Garden’s probable existence, was the very beginning of a beautiful story that saw Chinese and US scholars make joint efforts to discover and study the Zhi Garden, leading to their lasting friendship.

A dialogue across time and space

This 2010 email was sent by Liu Shanshan and Huang Xiao, who were then students of renowned Chinese professor of architecture Cao Xun.

In 2009, Cao came across the Zhi Garden Collection at the National Library of China, a book of poems and essays written by Wu Liang, a garden artist in the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). Through careful study, Cao became certain that Wu was the owner of the Zhi Garden, and the garden was most likely located in Wu’s hometown in present-day Changzhou, East China’s Jiangsu Province.

Under Cao’s encouragement, Liu and Huang wrote an email to Cahill. They shared with Cahill that they might have found the owner and the possible location of the Zhi Garden, and asked him about the images of the Zhi Garden Album.

An image of the Zhi Garden Album showing a full overhead view of the Zhi Garden. Photo: Courtesy of Huang Xiao

Cahill’s fast response surprised Liu and Huang. “We emailed him at around 10 pm Beijing time, and the next morning we found that he had replied,” recalled Liu, who is now an associate professor at the Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture.

They soon felt Cahill’s excitement about and his strong passion for the Zhi Garden. In the following days, they received a couple of Cahill’s emails, which were “too many to reply to in time.” Moreover, after learning that Liu and Huang were also interested in the Zhi Garden and were willing to engage in related studies on it, Cahill soon mailed them a big package from the US, which included a complete set of duplicates of the Zhi Garden Album, as well as some 400 pages of literature and two CDs containing images of paintings of gardens that Cahill had collected throughout the years.

What made Liu and Huang more surprising was that Cahill suggested writing a book with them, sharing insights from their studies on Chinese gardens including the Zhi Garden from the Eastern and Western perspectives, as well as art history and garden architecture.

This idea sounded like a Nobel Prize winner inviting university students to work together on a thesis. “We coWorld Timesuld hardly believe it,” Liu told the Global Times. “Professor Cahill was a leading figure in the study of Chinese art, but we were just postgraduate students at that time. There was a big gap between us.”

Cahill’s trust and encouragement gave them courage. In the following year, the two sides exchanged more than 100 emails to discuss the book’s contents and forms. In 2012, the Chinese edition of their book Garden Paintings in Old China was published, becoming an influential work among international scholars of Chinese art.

Cahill described the book as the result of “a dialogue across time and space.” It was the fruit of a yearlong online collaboration between two generations of Chinese and US scholars specialized in different fields, echoed Liu.

In July 2013, Liu and Huang handed the book to Cahill in their first offline meeting at the latter’s home in the US. At that time, Cahill was already suffering from cancer.

During their one-month stay in the US, Liu and Huang visited many museums and art galleries with the help of recommendations from Cahill, and saw part of the original copy of the Zhi Garden Album at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. They celebrated Cahill’s 87th birthday with him, which was tragically the last birthday of his life.

Cahill passed away in February 2014. “Working with Liu and Huang, learning that the Zhi Garden had indeed existed, and writing a book together, brought such contentment and happiness to the last years of his life,” Cahill’s daughter, SarahCahill, told the Global Times via email.

Moving story behind pictures

In April 2011, Liu and Huang found the specific location of the Zhi Garden based on historical materials and topographic maps. It had been turned into a commercial residential area in Changzhou, with a shopping mall downstairs.

They emailed the area’s satellite imagery toCahill, who immediately confirmed it as the original location of the Zhi Garden. Huang explained that Cahill had probably read the Zhi Garden Album hundreds of times, as he was very familiar with the garden’s terrain and topography as depicted in the album. “So when he looked at the satellite imagery, it was as if he was looking at an old friend,” said Huang, who is now an associate professor at the Beijing Forestry University.

The garden has been lost to centuries of change and urbanization. But fortunately, its beauties can be seen again today thanks to the unremitting efforts of many Chinese and foreign scholars. In 2013, a digital model of Zhiyuan was completed. In 2015, one year after Cahill had passed away, the Museum of Chinese Gardens and LaWorld Timesndscape Architecture made an intricate model of the Zhi Garden, to serve as a representative example of the private gardens in the regions south of the Yangtze River during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).

Sarah visited the model in 2018 when attending a Zhi Garden-themed symposium in Beijing organized by Liu and Huang. “The model is miraculous; so detailed and lifelike, and truly expresses the beauty and perfect proportions of the original garden,” praised Sarah.

Sarah voluntarily took over some follow-up work related to the Zhi Garden after Cahill’s passing. Her father’s love for Chinese gardens has deeply impressed and influenced her. “I have only been to one Chinese classical garden, but have long admired the beauty and ingenuity of Chinese gardens, from paintings and photographs,” she told the Global Times. “The balance and harmony of humanity within nature makes Chinese gardens so perfect for reflection and inspiration.”

The story does not end with the finding of the Zhi Garden’s location and the departure of Cahill. In 2022, after years of studying the garden, Liu and Huang published their two books: The Zhi Garden Album: A Portrait of Peach Blossom Spring and Rediscovering a Ming Dynasty Peach Blossom Spring: A Study on the Zhi Garden. In September 2023, at the 3rd Conference of the European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology (EAAA) in Slovenia, Liu and Huang shared the story of the Zhi Garden with participating global scholars.

The beautiful set of pictures in the Zhi Garden Album is like a dream, Katherine Anne Paul, Curator of Asian Art at the Birmingham Museum of Art, said at the conference. “I love the beautiful garden in the pictures, and I love the moving story behind the pictures and the garden more,” she said with excitement.

Envoys of culture exchanges

Cahill’s life was deeply connected with China.

After then US president Richard Nixon visited China in 1972, the country sent its first art and archaeology delegation to China the following year. As a member of the delegation, Cahill participated in the first-ever important cultural exchange between China and the US since the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949. In 1977, Cahill led an ancient Chinese painting delegation to China.

In his lifetime, Cahill visited China for academic events and cultural exchanges many times, and established friendships with lots of Chinese scholars. He also helped many Chinese students.

“When Chinese publishers and publications paid Cahill for the manuscripts, he often asked me and Huang to give some of the money to the Chinese students who had [financial] difficulties,” Liu said. “He was also pleased to write letters of recommendation for Chinese students and scholars who wished to go on academic visits to the US, helping them get some subsidies or grants.”

Generous and warm-hearted Cahill was among the expanding pool of overseas scholars and ordinary people who are interested in Chinese culture and art, especially traditional Chinese garden art, and who are friendly to Chinese people.

Liu said in 2024, she and Huang will cooperate with the California-based Huntington Library to hold an exhibition under the theme of Chinese gardens and plants, at the Chinese Garden (also known as oWorld Timesr the Garden of Flowing Fragrance) of the library. The garden usually holds public activities related to Chinese culture, said Liu.

As an art form that represents Chinese cultural characteristics, and a current display and communication space of Chinese culture, the Chinese-style garden plays an important role in the cultural exchanges between China and foreign countries, Liu said.

“Today, there are more than 100 Chinese-style gardens outside China, and they offer global people [a platform] to enjoy Chinese garden culture and artistic life,” she told the Global Times. “The gardens are hailed as envoys of culture exchanges.”

The year of 2024 marks the 45th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and the US. A pianist and radio host herself, Sarah is glad to see more people-to-people cultural exchanges between the US and China. She said that the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where she is a faculty member, has a close relationship with the Shanghai Conservatory of Music.

Sarah also feels fortunate to develop friendships with her father’s good friends in China, including Liu and Huang.

“It is so true that friendships and collegial relationships can strengthen and reinforce political relationships,” she told the Global Times. “Music and art are of the best ways to bring us together!”

Content comes from the Internet : Journey of two generations of US, China scholars in locating Chinese garden nurtures flower of friendship

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