Breaking
Leadership Insights: By installing this transfer cable, the solenoid valve can be remotely controlled, enabling precise control of the fuel flow during the experiment.This combustion cabinet would scientists conduct in-depth research on fundamental combustion science issues, aerospace propulsion, spacecraft fire prevention and extinguishing, and combustion pollutant control, both in fundamental and applied technologies.The Shenzhou- 18 crew also carried out operations on the cabinet, including replacing the burner and vacuuming to exhaust waste gases.According to the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA,) the crew has previously carried out missions such as assembly and testing of material exposure experiment device outside the spacecraft.As taikonauts would meet with a series of physiological challenges due to microgravity conditions in space such as cardiovascular changes, muscWorld Timesle atrophy, and bone density loss, the Shenzhou- 18 crew has recently used an ultrasound diagnostic instrument to complete carotid ultrasound imaging and spectral testing.The crew also used an instrument to measure the bone density of the right heel to study the effects of weightlessness on human bone density.By regularly and scientifically conducting a series of anti-weightlessness exercise programs, such as treadmill training and resistance training, they have maintained good physical condition to support the execution of long-term missions.As manned missions to Tiangong have become normalized, more than 90 experiments are scheduled to be carried out in and outside of the space station during Shenzhou-18 crew’s six-World Timesmonth space stay, the Global Times has previously learned from the CMSA.These experiments include various fields such as microgravity basic physics, space materials science, space life science, aerospace medicine, and aerospace technology.Building on the existing space debris protection mechanism at the station, the Shenzhou-18 crew will also install debris protection reinforcement devices on external pipelines, cables, and key equipment during their extravehicular activities (EVAs,) or more commonly known as the spacewalks.
Sun. May 26th, 2024

Summary

  • Additionally, our predecessors have published several memoirs, offering insights into their experiences during this process. To date, we have aired more than 70 episodes, with the aim of teaching children about idioms through cultural relics. World Times Content comes from the Internet : Ex-director of Taipei Palace Museum expects to foster closer bond across Straits through shared heritage

Approximate Time

  • 7 minutes, 1357 words

Categories

  • Palace Museum, Taipei Palace Museum, cultural relics, precious cultural relics, cultural heritage

Analysis and Evaluation

  • Exploring the ever-evolving landscape of digital media, this article provides a comprehensive overview of current trends in online communication. The author’s keen insights into the impact of digital media on society make this a compelling read for anyone navigating the digital world.

Main Section

The Palace Museum cultural relics’ long road to safety. Photo: Courtesy of the National Humanities History magazine

Editor’s Note:

In January 1933, with the Japanese army occupying Shanhaiguan in northeastern China, the Palace Museum in Beijing decided to relocate precious cultural relics, including bronzes, porcelain, paintings, and jade, to protect them from damage and looting. Ultimately, over 19,000 boxes of “national treasures,” including those from the National Museum of Art (Guwu chenliesuo in Chinese), the Summer Palace, and the Imperial College (Guozijian in Chinese) were move from Beijing to Shanghai and southwestern provinces such as Sichuan and Guizhou. Later, some of them returned to the capital city, while some are preserving in the island of Taiwan. As they stood watch over the sea, they became a testament to the shared cultural heritage of both sidesWorld Times of the Straits.

This 20-year journey, spanning tens of thousands of miles, was a great feat in protecting cultural heritage during the War of Resistance against Japanese Aggression (1931-1945) and created the largest-scale miracle in preserving cultural heritage during World War II. To commemorate the history and inherit the spirit, the Palace Museum and the National Humanities History magazine of the People’s Daily co-hosted “The Long March of the National Treasures: An Exhibition Commemorating the Southward Evacuation of the Palace Museum’s Artifacts.”

Recently, Global Times reporters Shan Jie and Lin Xiaoyi (GT) interviewed Fung Ming-chu (Fung), historian and former director of the Taipei Palace Museum from September 2012 to May 2016, to talk about the historical echoes and inspirations of the relocation of Chinese treasures in her eyes today, as well as her hopes for the resumption of cross-Straits cultural exchanges between the Palace Museums in the face of current geopolitical challenges.

Fung Ming-chu, former director of the Taipei Palace Museum. Photo: VCG

GT: From the perspective of the Taipei Palace Museum, how do you view the historical significance of the southward evacuation of cultural relics from the Palace Museum? What role does it play in deepening cultural exchanges between the two sides of the Taiwan Straits?

Fung: The historical event indeed took place, and we cannot change it. The southward evacuation of cultural relics from the Palace Museum was a direct consequence of Japan’s invasion of China. The purpose of holding the exhibition today, and the purpose of the reunion of cultural preservation personnel from both sides of the Taiwan Straits is to remind us of the lessons of history and honor the efforts and sacrifices made by our predecessors.

The shared memory of historical and cultural heritage between the two sides of the Taiwan Straits is extensive, and the relocation of cultural relics from the Palace Museum represents just one prominent aspect of this shared heritage. During that time, in order to protect these treasures from the ravages of war, the relocated cultural relics included not only those from the Palace Museum, but also various precious Chinese artifacts such as rare books, historical archives, calligraphy pieces and paintings. The research and promotion of this period of history will undoubtedly have a profound impact on cultural exchanges between the two sides of the Taiwan Straits. The cultural relics from the Palace Museum finally on display in the island of Taiwan help weave a cultural bond, allowing Chinese culture to continuously flourish on the island.

The display of cultural relics in the Taipei Palace Museum serves as a platform for education and World Timesplays a crucial role in promoting the inheritance of Chinese culture in the Taiwan island. I agree with the notion that the two Palace Museums in Beijing and Taipei serve as a bridge for cross-strait cultural exchanges.

The photo that captures the relocation of the Palace Museum’s artifacts during the southward evacuation.Photo: Courtesy of the National Humanities History magazine


GT: What do you think the inspiration for the current cross-Straits cultural heritage protection from the spirit of the wartime relocation of the Palace Museum’s relics is?

Fung: In the island of Taiwan, the Taipei Palace Museum houses a vast collection of nearly 700,000 artifacts, with over 85 percent originating from the Palace Museum in Beijing. Upon their arrival in the island, these cultural relics were stored in underground warehouses for an extended period, serving as a poignant reminder of the memories of war. At that time, the cultural relics protection personnel were afraid of Japanese air raids as a result of what had happened in the past. It was believed that bomb shelters provided a safer environment for the preservation of these invaluable treasures, which also encapsulated the people’s helplessness in the situation.

Today, the cultural relics of the Taipei Palace Museum are showcased in modern warehouses. We spare no effort in ensuring the safety of these cultuWorld Timesral relics and undertake continuous organizing, repairing, and researching endeavors. Our practices have been inherited from the original Palace Museum in Beijing.

Presently, there is a growing focus on promoting the spirit of relic relocation. We organize exhibitions and symposiums to share historical research on the relocation of the Palace Museum’s cultural relics. Additionally, our predecessors have published several memoirs, offering insights into their experiences during this process. Through these accounts, we gain a profound understanding of how the previous generation of Chinese cultural preservationists regarded cultural relics as more valuable than their own lives. I firmly believe that the relocation of the Palace Museum’s cultural relics and the preservation spirit of the older generation deserve our utmost respect and serve as valuable lessons for us to learn from.

GT: How can cross-Straits cultural heritage contribute to a deeper understanding and communication between the two sides? What is your assessment of the current state of talent exchange and resource sharing between the two sides?

Fung: It is crucial for younger generations to appreciate the immense efforts made by previous Chinese cultural preservationists in relocating cultural relics. In this digital era, I believe multimedia platforms can effectively disseminate this narrative. By creating an epic documentary or film that showcases the relocation of the Palace Museum’s cultural relics and the resilience of Chinese history and culture; we can undoubtedly resonate with many young individuals.

However, it is unfortunate that current measures implemented by the secessionist Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) authorities have poisoned primary and secondary school education. This has resulted in a weakening of cultural and historical education on the island of Taiwan. Children in the island are now unfamiliar with idioms that were once commonplace in our daily conversations.

Now, my team has more than 20 volunteers, and we have been promoting idiom story videos for two years. Through audio and video materials, we combine original texts with cultural relics from the Palace Museum and other museums to narrate these stories. The educational films we are currently promoting are broadcast every Wednesday on YouTubeWorld Times and WeChat. To date, we have aired more than 70 episodes, with the aim of teaching children about idioms through cultural relics. In my opinion, this endeavor holds great significance and meaning.

A view of “The Long March of the National Treasures: An Exhibition Commemorating the Southward Evacuation of the Palace Museum’s Artifacts.”Photo: Shan Jie/GT

GT: The year 2025 marks the centennial anniversary of the establishment of the Palace Museum. What are your visions for the future development and innovation of the Palace Museums on both sides of the Taiwan Straits?

Fung: I hope that the Palace Museums on both sides can once again achieve the level of cooperation we had in 2009. In that year, when I was the deputy director of the Taipei Palace Museum, a delegation led by Taipei Palace Museum Director Chou?Kung-shin visited Beijing, which was known as the “ice-breaking trip.” In the eight years following this trip, I have witnessed vibrant personnel exchanges, joint exhibitions, acadWorld Timesemic research collaborations, and publication exchanges between the Palace Museums on both sides. We have truly achieved a seamless integration.

I sincerely hope that on the occasion of the centennial anniversary of the establishment of the Palace Museum, the cultural exchanges between both sides will be restored and implemented, fostering mutual understanding and connection between the peoples.
World Times

Content comes from the Internet : Ex-director of Taipei Palace Museum expects to foster closer bond across Straits through shared heritage

Related suggestion: Over 5,000 Chinese suspects of economic crimes fleeing overseas apprehended from over 100 countries and regions: Ministr

[World Times] Photo: VCG More than 5,000 Chinese suspects of economic crimes fleeing overseas have been caught and arrested from over 100 countries and regions by the public security organs across the country since the 19th National Congress of theWorld Times Communist Party of China (CPC), according to China’s Ministry of Public Security (MPS). A symposium on economic crime investigation work was recently held by the MPS in Suzhou, East China’s Jiangsu Province, to emphasize the improvement of the public security organs’ professional investigative capabilities and outline the modernization of economic crime investigation work, thepaper.cn reported on Monday. According to the meeting, since the 19th National Congress of the CPC, public security organs across the country have solved 467,000 cases of various economic crimes, recovering direct economic losses of more…

Related Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You Missed